Being embroiled in one of the most contentious presidential campaigns in recent American memory, The Picture Professional chooses to look in a different direction. In this sampling of images, we look to our own earlier days and to places where the privilege of voting was new and worth any cost.

Whatever your politics, wherever you stand, please vote. This is an important time to make a real choice—even when many feel there is little-to-no choice. Imagine what you want this country to look like, to sound like, on the world stage, and how we can serve our nation’s original ideals. Involvement matters. VOTE.

dph-6836_lrRight to Vote T-shirt slogan in a Caribbean neighborhood in East Flatbush, Brooklyn on Election Day 2012
© Debra P. Hershkowitz

ap_060206013207An electoral worker pastes sheets with the lists of voters at a voting station on the eve of the presidential elections in Gonaives, Haiti on Monday Feb. 6, 2006. Haiti will hold its long-delayed elections next Feb. 7 aimed at restoring the country’s elusive democracy, two years after a bloody revolt ousted elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, who is now in exile. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

ap_10111509018A  southern Sudanese woman displays her inked finger after registering to vote in the southern town of Melut on Monday, Nov. 15, 2010. Voter registration is under way in Southern Sudan in preparation for a January independence referendum that could see the creation of the world’s newest country. More than 2,600 registration centers opened Monday across the vast and undeveloped south. (AP Photo/Pete Muller)

ap_9909110711A 90-year-old woman is carried in a basket to a polling booth on the outskirts of Madras, India Saturday, September 11, 1999. Polling was held in 19 constituencies all over Madras in the second phase of polling in Indian elections. (AP Photo/Desikan Krishnan)

ap_090422056755People queue to cast their votes at a polling station in the Katlehong township, east of Johannesburg, South Africa, Wednesday, April 22, 2009. Voters lined up before sunrise Wednesday in an election that has generated an excitement not seen since South Africa’s first multiracial vote in 1994, and that was expected to propel Jacob Zuma to the presidency after he survived corruption and sex scandals. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

ap_328851488457A Tunisian man shows his ink-stained finger in front of a Tunisian flag after voting for the country’s parliamentary elections outside the Tunisian embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Oct. 25, 2014. On Sunday, Tunisians will vote for their first five-year parliament since they overthrew dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, marking the end of the democratic transition that they alone among the pro-democracy Arab Spring uprisings have managed to achieve. Now, many Tunisians are expressing disillusionment over democracy. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

 

National Anti-Suffrage Association About This Item •Title: National Anti-Suffrage Association •Creator(s): Harris & Ewing, photographer •Date Created/Published: [1911(?)] •Medium: 1 photographic print. •Summary: Photograph shows men looking at material posted in the window of the National Anti-Suffrage Association headquarters; sign in window reads "Headquarters National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage". •Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-25338 (b&w film copy neg.) •Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication. •Call Number: SSF - Women--Politics and Suffrage--191- [item] [P&P] •Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print •Notes: ?No. 2189. ?Title from item. •Subjects: ?National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage--Buildings--1910-1920. ?Women's suffrage--1910-1920. ?Organizations' facilities--1910-1920. •Format: ?Photographic prints--1910-1920. •Collections: ?Miscellaneous Items in High Demand •Bookmark This Record: •   http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/97500067/ View the MARC Record for this item. Rights assessment is your responsibility.

Photograph shows men looking at material posted in the window of the National Anti-Suffrage Association headquarters; sign in window reads “Headquarters National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage”.  LC-USZ62-25338, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

 Mrs. Suffern with a home-made banner in the parade, wearing a sash and carrying a sign that says “Help us to win the vote,” surrounded by a crowd of men and boys.
LC-USZ62-135533, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

Suffrage parade, 1913 About This Item Obtaining Copies Access to Original Title: Suffrage parade, 1913 Creator(s): Bain News Service, publisher Date Created/Published: 1913 (date created or published later by Bain) Medium: 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ggbain-11383 (digital file from original negative) Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication. Call Number: LC-B2- 2503-4 [P&P] Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Notes: Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). General information about the Bain Collection is available at http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Additional information about this photograph might be available through the Flickr Commons project at http://www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/2615540529 Format: Glass negatives. Collections: Bain Collection Bookmark This Record: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ggb2005011488/ View the MARC Record for this item. Rights assessment is your responsibility.Women’s Suffrage parade, 1913
LC-B2- 2503-4 Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

ap_16179691124469In this May 3, 1939 file photo, a hooded man displayed a hangman’s noose dangling from an automobile as a warning for blacks to stay away from voting places in the municipal primary election at Miami. In spite of the threats, 616 blacks voted. Born in the ashes of the smoldering South after the Civil War, the Ku Klux Klan died and was reborn before losing the fight against civil rights in the 1960s. (AP Photo)

ap_650321013Marchers cross the Alabama river on the Edmund Pettus Bridge at Selma on March 21, 1965. The civil rights marchers, eight abreast, are led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This is the start of their five day, 50-mile march to the State Capitol of Montgomery, Alabama. They are fighting for voter registration rights for blacks, who are discouraged from registering to vote, particularly in small towns in the south. (AP Photo)

ap_090120049136President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama dance at the Commander in Chief Inaugural Ball at the National Building Museum in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2009. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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